What I Love About My Pump

No alarm clocks!

When I was using Levemir, it only lasted 7 hours for me so I took it every 8 hours and supplemented with Apidra the times that it fell short.  I can’t really complain about Levemir because it was a nice, flat insulin for me and I did not have to worry about the times I had to skip meals or just did not want to eat.  I have a dual-alarm clock and had it set for 11 PM in case I fell asleep early and 7 AM in case I did not wake up early.  Most mornings, I wake up about 5 and was downstairs long before my alarm would go off at 7.  Unfortunately, I can’t say the same thing for being awake at 11 PM!

I also have dawn phenomenon (DP) so my blood sugar starts to go up about 5 AM.  And of course the thing to do to correct that is have some fast acting insulin.  Once I started using a CGMS, that was like a built in alarm clock that would start to beep at me it was time to take insulin!

Now that I am using an insulin pump, I have my basals set to help out with DP.  Of course, everyone is different and you need to do some basal testing to figure out what will work for you, but I have my basal rates increasing at 3 AM and again at 5 AM.  That works for my body and I have done basal testing to know that works.  Unfortunately for me, I am so used to waking up early, I am usually awake even if I don’t have to get up to take insulin.

Monday evening, my Dexcom sensor decided to croak and it was almost 10 PM when I put a new one on.  I was also doing some stuff that evening and seemed to be full of energy so was actually still awake when the Dexcom alerted me close to midnight that I needed to do the calibration.  Not too long after that, I went up to bed.  I am not sure of the exact time, but Letterman was still on and his show runs until about 12:30.  After I crawled in bed, I was just really cold and I remembered that I had not turned the heat on before coming upstairs so went down & turned that back on.  I know that after Letterman went off, I turned the channel to CNN and that is the last thing that I remember doing. 

Tuesday morning, I woke up and it was light in my room so I knew that it was later than normal for me to wake up but did not realize how late until I looked at the clock – it was about 10:50 AM!  My next thoughts were, OMG, my BS and I grabbed my Dexcom.  The Dexcom said my BS was 82.   Of course I thought, that can’t be right.  Sometimes when you put a new sensor on, it is not always accurate.  My next step was to grab my meter and that said my BS was 81.  You can’t get much better than that! 

That is not something that could ever have happened doing MDI.  Even if you only take your basal insulin twice a day, sleeping in that late would still be almost impossible, especially with DP.  I guess I should take that statement back and say that sleeping in that late is possible with MDI, but not if you want to wake up with a decent BS showing on your meter!

I really don’t want to get into a habit of doing that every day, but it is nice to know when you are tired, you can catch up on some needed, uninterrupted sleep!

Just wanted to throw in another reminder to watch the Big Blue Test video on YouTube – it is a good cause!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nkLHgK94Z0E

 
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3 thoughts on “What I Love About My Pump

  1. Sorry it took so long to reply Anna. I don’t sleep in too often either but it is nice to have the option if we need it! Of course, my dog is still on the old time and even though my clock said 7 this morning, he thought it was 8!

    Instead of doing basal testing for 8 hours like most people do, I like to do mine for 24 hours and then I know it is set right. May as well get it over with!

    Although I can do well with the pump, I am not sure I would ever go back to MDI. Although I am sure you probably said that at one point also! I head the Ping came to Canada so are you going to upgrade?

  2. Glad to hear that the pump is working out for you. That’s what I love about mine – is that I can sleep in (don’t do that too often) – and still wake up with a BG that’s not screaming HIGH HIGH HIGH (and not in a friendly way).

    The way a basal setting should work – is that you can go without having to do any tweaking inbetween with a bolus (or with MDI – shot of rapid insulin). I’ve pretty well perfected the DP now – like you say – with doing basal tests – you can perfect it. Like anything tho’ little hormonal things, etc. can throw that whole “perfection” thing out the door – but we just adjust with a shot of juice – to even things out. If it continues, then it’s back to the drawing board for us.

    I think the good thing for both of us – is that we can do well with both MDI and insulin pump. Not many can say this.

  3. Glad to hear that the pump is working out for you. That’s what I love about mine – is that I can sleep in (don’t do that too often) – and still wake up with a BG that’s not screaming HIGH HIGH HIGH (and not in a friendly way).

    The way a basal setting should work – is that you can go without having to do any tweaking inbetween with a bolus (or with MDI – shot of rapid insulin). I’ve pretty well perfected the DP now – like you say – with doing basal tests – you can perfect it. Like anything tho’ little hormonal things, etc. can throw that whole “perfection” thing out the door – but we just adjust with a shot of juice – to even things out. If it continues, then it’s back to the drawing board for us.

    I think the good thing for both of us – is that we can do well with both MDI and insulin pump. Not many can say this.

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